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20121027
20121104
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on his statement that he'd cut fema and return it to the states. the campaign has a clear media strategy on that front, and many others, of course. it's three weeks since mr. romney took a question from any reporter. let's get rate to our panel, as we await the president. richard wolffe is with me, the vp and executive editor of msnbc.com. and in washington, msnbc analyst eugene robinson, a pulitzer prize-winning columnist for "the washington post." richard, if i can start with you. with all due respect to romney and ryan, this is a big government moment, isn't it? this is a moment when, for all that they've said throughout this campaign, mr. ryan, mr. romney, about how they want to eviscera eviscerate government, this is actually a moment when we need government. >> it's a time when pieces of government come together, state, local, and federal. it's a moment when you move beyond party. they're not republicans and democrats in new jersey, they're just americans in need. and those messages, of course, resonate with americans in general. they also happen to be part of what the president an
the fema mumbo jumbo. i got a call from fema at 2 a.m. the president has been all over this and he deserves great credit. i was on the phone with him yesterday three times personally. he gave me his number at the white house. told me to call him. and he absolutely means it. the president has been outstanding in this. so the folks at fema, craig fugate and his folks have been excellent. >> the president deserves great credit. he's been outstanding. a republican praising a democrat. but the powerful fact is this wasn't about politics. this was genuine thanks to a president focused on taking care of americans. president obama has canceled all campaign events through tomorrow to focus on hurricane sandy. today he went to the red cross headquarters, and devastated families were standing by. >> obviously, this is something that is heartbreaking for the entire nation. we certainly feel profoundly for all the families whose lives have been up-ended. most important message i have for them is that america's ready. we are standing behind you and we are going to do everything we can to help you get bac
of the guys who's running isn't. the president has been outstanding in this and so the folks of fema, craig fugate and his folks have been excellent. >> overwhelmingly positive assessment of the president. >> he's not just a romney surrogate, the keynote speaker of the republican convention we saw and just to put it in context, one of the major premise sis of the romney campaign is barack obama came to power promising to bring the country together and, in fact, mitt romney is the guy do that. over this last three, four years, the president for all his efforts to reach out and find some compromise has been cornered into a position where he's been denied republican cooperation. so any endorsement, especially an endorsement at this point, even if it's an endorsement about a natural disaster, from a prominent republican, is really worth every piece of benefit that you can get because it says to independents, be it says to those moderate republicans, maybe this president isn't quite as polarizing as we thought. maybe there is a -- can't get the votes in congress what he wants to do he's not so u
on the stump in florida today. the candidate is still staying quiet on his commitment to fema, but a campaign spokesperson released this statement, so good that we can hear from the campaign on this and not the candidate, right? "a romney/ryan administration will always ensure that disaster funding is there for those in need, period." period? vice president joe biden was campaigning also in the sunshine state today. president obama returns to the campaign trail tomorrow. he plans to barnstorm seven battleground states over the next several days. but today we did not see politics in action. what we saw was government in action. people with authority to make decisions. chris christie is not the first person, i think, that you would think of when you come to the, you know, arena of bipartisan cooperation. he is a mitt romney supporter and a fierce opponent of many democratic issues. for whatever reason, we saw a different chris christie with president obama today. this is what cooperation looks like. when the american people need government to work, these two elected officials became leaders and
. >> romney's silence has been deafening. >> would you eliminate aid to fema if you were president? >> as hurricane sandy wreaks havoc across the northeast, first responders, nurses and neighbors have stepped up in tremendous acts of heroism. we'll take a look at these brave men and women tonight. but first we'll bring you the latest on the disaster across the northeast. >> good to have you with us tonight. thanks for watching. the aftermath of sandy is coming into focus and the destruction is heartbreaking. sandy's path devastated miles of shoreline and major communities. officials in nine states are reporting 44 deaths related to the storm. 23 of those here in the state of new york. it's estimated to cost between $30 and $50 billion. you only need to look at the images of the flooding to see why. a 14-foot storm surge in lower manhattan roadways were overflowing. tunnels filled with water. streets were submerge d. most of lower manhattan continues to be without power at this hour. the new york city subway system is still not running as workers deal with the flooded tunnels and th
is recalled with the im. talk about fema, people think about the bush legacy. and so, he doesn't have make those contrastic splits, never mind about mitt romney, that helps him because he's doing stuff and it's all out there without the effort. >> you get the unearned assist from michael brown coming out. >> we'll talk about brownie. >> you couldn't ask for that. you couldn't make that bet. >> but there's karen welcome. hi. >> welcome to the show. i want to say, it's not just the presidential thing. it's also -- there's incredibly moving -- let's not forget the human toll this storm's taken. >> absolutely. >> the images of the president consoling americans in the wake of this massive disaster are incredibly powerful images. and what you heard in the president, what you heard from the president on the stump just now was empathy, this sense that he is fighting for you, that you have a seat at the table, middle class, working class americans, that he is there for you. and that fundamentally has been a problem for mitt romney. not only do you have the president looking presidential and making
population? >> so the challenge for those cities, states, and fema is how to deal with getting whatever necessary help is needed for the elderly and the poor who are not as situated for such a crisis as unusual as this storm is turning out to be? >> right. all these disasters we've watched and they were elderly, disabled, and poor people by themselves. that's the population. much of the talk that has happened so far has dealt with strategy and tactics and risk communications. in the coming hours and days it's going to be about logistics, reverend, al. it's going to be about real people. thereby, the mayors need to encourage their people as soon as the storm passes through is for neighbors to check on neighbors because neighbors will keep more people alive than first responders. with all due respect, the mayors are going to have to keep the streets open so people can take care of one another because there are not enough first responders. the other thing is, get businesses open that have food and water and feed people. get restaurants opened. because people will need that because on the b
government sf ready. >> we have prepositioned assets so that fema personnel are working closely with state and local governments. we're making sure that food and water and emergency generation is available. i'm confident that we're ready, but i think the public needs to prepare for the fact that this is going to take a long time for us to clean up. >> and with that lengthy cleanup in mind, the president was asked about the potential impact on the quickly approaching election. >> the election will take care of itself next week. right now our number one priority is to make sure that we are saving lives, that our search and rescue teams are going to be in place, that people are going to get the food, the water, the shelter they need in case of emergency and that we respond as quickly as possible to get the economy back on track. >> as for mitt romney, he and paul ryan have canceled events tonight and tomorrow, but earlier in ohio governor romney did extend his concern and sympathy. >> on the eastern coast of our nation a lot of people are enduring some very difficult times, and our hearts and
. >> as we know, that help is going out to fema, mobilizing resources to help the governors impacted by sandy and the people in their states. however last year it was during one of the primary debates where governor romney had this to say about what should happen in fema. take a listen. >> fema is about to run out of money and some people who say, you know, maybe we're learning a lesson that the state should take on more. how do you deal with that? >> absolutely, any time you have occasion to send it back from the federal government and send it back to the states and if you can go further and send it back to the private sector. >> the president signed these major disaster declarations for the state of new jersey and new york. they seem to be grateful for the help of fema and the president. wouldn't president romney want to do away with fema and ship those resources back to the states? do we know for sure? >> yea. absolutely. he's not opposed to that by any means. i think what the governor is talking about and we've seen cases in the past is trying to make sure that fema is the most effective
for shutting down fema and passing the responsibility on to the states. >> fema is about to run out of money and some people say do it on a case-by-case basis and some who say maybe we're learning a lesson here the states should take on more of this role. >> absolutely. every time you have an occasion to take something from the federal government and send it back to the states, that's the right direction. and if you can go even further and send it back to the private sector that's even better. we're borrowing $1.6 trillion more this year than we're taking in. >> including disaster relief? >> we cannot afford to do those things without jeopardizing the future for our kids. it is simply immoral in my view. for us to continue to rack up larger and larger debt and pass them on to our kids, knowing full well that we'll all be dead and gone before it's paid off makes no sense at all. >> just to recap, governor romney, at least the governor romney of 2011, believed the government could not afford programs like fema and i said it was immoral and made no sense to keep spending money on disaster relie
so that fema personnel are working closely with state and local governments. we're making sure that food and water and emergency generation is available for those communities that are going to be hardest hit. transportation is going to be tied up for a long time. and probably the most significant impact for a lot of people in addition to flooding, is going to be getting power back on. the fact is, a lot of these emergency crews are not going to be able to get into position to start restoring pooir until some of the winds have died down. >> joining me for the latest on. power and scope of sandy is nbc meteorologist bill kerrins. bill, the mayor of new york seemed to indicate the worst is over in new york city. where is the country now in this storm? because it covers a lot more than the state of new york? >> well, if this was a sporting event we're heading toward the end. we've seen the worst of it. we've seen the most damage and the most extreme damage on the coast with the high tide cycle we just got done with but all the water has to rush out and we still have wirnds blowing
. >> michael brown, in charge of fema, is criticizing president obama. >> brownie, you're doing a heck of a job. >> brown would have said more but he was busy responding to katrina. >> garbage, crap, and nonsense. >> you're watching fox. you're hearing about a state department, the cia does nothing. >> you are misleading the american people. >> at least we don't live in swing state hell. >> jeep, now owned by the italians, is thinking of moving all production to china. >> the biggest load of bull in the world. >> why do you say these things, mi romney? >> joe biden is using his teeth to illuminate hoboken. >> find that special someone in the early voting line. >> our destiny is in the hands of the american people. >> i will fight for you and your family every single day as hard as i know how. >> let's get to our panel, dana 34i8 bank is political columnist for "the washington post" and toure is my colleague and the co-host of "the cycle." desperate mitt, desperate measures. in your column this week you write, when the stakes are high, as they are for mr. romney, it must win ohio, the truth is o
. they're offering seven million meals over the next few days through fema, opening 50 shelters around the state and dispatching national guard troops to help people stranded in the storm. the governor's office asking all residents to be very patient, saying this will not be an easy storm to recover from and especially be patient with power still out, saying it could take days, even up to a week for that power to come back on. back to you. >> nbc's janel klein reporting in snowshoe, west virginia. our thanks to jannel and all of our correspondents for their reports. >>> we just got a new photograph of president obama this morning making an unscheduled stop at fema headquarters. the president has made it clear that he wants no red tape when it comes to the government getting what they need to hands the aftermath of the storm, for the government to get to people their needs. the president also visited fema ahead of the storm's landfall with that same message. this reminder, he's leaving for new jersey and the meeting with the governor and mayor of atlantic city in the next hour. we'll br
his position on fema, just like he wouldn't talk to us about his tax record? i find it interesting t thematically we're back where we started. when voters are asking themselves, who can you trust, to your question, look no further than what the themes have been throughout this election. >> the republicans over the last decade have proven to the american people they are not about compromise. >> right. >> they are about power. and the democrats now are in pretty good shape to, i think, hang on to the senate and president obama's re-election looks pretty good right now. if it was a closing argument, what do you think the best closing argument would be for mitt romney right now? i mean, is reaching across the aisle, or should he seriously advocate for some policy that he hasn't been definitive on? >> you know, i think what he's trying to do, he's kind of gone small. this is, he's back to sort of the strategy he had during the republican primary, which is, he just doesn't want to make a mistake. he's trying to run down the clock. >> no interviews. >> that's right. >> i have never seen any
. he is locked down at the white house, telephoning governors and mayors and meeting with fema. >> mitt romney is not campaigning but holding what his campaign calls a hurricane relief event coincidentally in battleground ohio. >> we have a lot of goods here and i know there's more coming in and we're going to box these things up in just a minute and put them on some trucks and then we're going to send them into i think it's new jersey. >> new yorkers ordered off the streets last night it was a lonely late night for letterman and fallon. no live audiences to laugh at their jokes. >> got up this morning, turned on the radio and listened for the talk show closings. i have no luck. >> talk show closings. >> yeah. >> that's a play on -- >> wait a minute. i think i hear people banging at the door of the theater demanding to come in. wait a minute! we don't want to miss this. the storm has stopped the presidential campaign, so at least some good has come of it. >> and good day. aim andrea mitchell, live in washington. not a laughing matter today. the northeast crippled by sandy. 8 million wit
with fema, how much do you think that may have had an impact, because it stopped whatever momentum mitt romney may have been enjoying. >> i would say i think the race is kind of upset. mitt romney got a bump off the first debate. by october 15th, the race had settled to where it was up until hurricane sandy. i point to the "washington post"/abc news, doing tracking polls every day about a week and a half now, the last two rolling tracks we've asked about president obama's job performance on sandy, 78% two days ago said excellent or good, 79% said excellent or good. yesterday. when you're dealing with the margins here, it can't hurt. i think the fact that the president got to be the president, kind of be bipartisan, to go up, look at things, that role, remember the people haven't decided yet, aren't partisans on either side. they tend to be independent on affiliated -- unaffiliated voters. who don't like that partisanship. for him to be with chris christie looking like they were working together for the good of the people in new jersey and new york, that accrues to his broad benefit. do
are. you hear, don't pol itisize thi. i want to listen to candidate romney talking about fema during a presidential debate. this is the key moment we all want to here. new studio. we don't have it this morning. i will read a bit of it. when he was asked about fema, mr. romney said absolutely every time you have an occasion to take something from the federal government and send it back to the state, that's the right direction. you can go further and send it back to the private sector. that's better. he talks about taking fema and divesting it into the states. yet, this week, i think that statement is many could go back to haunt him. is this more than anything a teachable moment for mitt romney? >> storms bring the best and the worst out in america. they both seem to show up during a natural disaster. a natural disaster is one that crosses a couple of states. i lived through hurricane hugo in 1989 and watched the politics of a hurricane. we were out of power. my business was down. for politicians, they have to be very careful. it can make or break a political career. this is where the
is flexing the muscle of incumbency. he spent sunday afternoon at fema headquarters in washington. >> this is a serious and big storm. and my first message is to all the people across the eastern seaboard, mid-atlantic going north that you need to take this very seriously. >> governor romney canceled his weekend events in virginia. instead he spent sunday with running mate, paul ryan, on a bus tour through ohio. >> i know that right now some people in the country are a little nervous about a storm about to hit the coast. and our thoughts and prayers are with the people who will find themselves in harm's way. >> even before today's changes, the storm had already altered the campaign travel calendar, if you will. vice president biden cut short a new hampshire campaign swing. and instead diverted to ohio. >> the last thing the president and i want to do is let this campaign get in the way of anything. the most important thing is people's safety and people's health and property being saved here. >> the tuesday schedule is also in jeopardy. romney canceled a stop in new hampshire. the
, fema resources to the state. the storm killed at least 18 people, two of whom from long island. peter king who represents parts of long island. also chairman of the homeland security committee. congressman king, i want to start with what you can tell me about the damage on long island. >> actually, this is by far the worst storm we've had at least since 1938. it's just in my district alone, long beach is basically entirely cut off, they have no sewage, they have no power, they have no water. there's going to be a mass evacuation of long beach. and there were are number of fires, seven fires i'm aware where the houses burned to the ground, fire department couldn't get to them. a man's house blew up last night. thank god his neighbor next door, the entire house blew up. the water's been contaminated in places. freeport, there's probably 90% of the people without power in the -- on long island. so this is, again, by far the worst. we have entire streets under water, 5, 6 feet of water. it's 5 feet of water everywhere. i can go community by community, what it turned out to be is that the
, it allows the people to authorize people to move into hotels or whatever is necessary. >> how is fema doing? >> that's one of the complaints, it's been the slow responsover all. tread cross just got here yesterday. i was working on getting them here for three days. fema just got here yesterday, but they really won't be on the ground until today. >> they've been at the shelters, though, as well. >> they just started yesterday. a few representatives with some basic information. but they will be on the ground today. >> okay. so we're having a meeting with them later today to lay out going door to door. >> and the mayor, how is he doing? we have the marathon coming up. you were fairly critical of that yesterday in your comments. what's your thoughts? >> listen, overall, i understand and i really do respect. the mayor has a tremendously difficult job and overall -- and he's done a pretty good job handling this. i do, though, i really disagree with the call for the marathon. i think it's wrong. and a big part of it is a couple reasons. first and foremost, just yesterday we're pulling bodies out o
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 127 (some duplicates have been removed)

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